Euro-Sante :: Euro-Health

This is a summary of some emerging and salient issues related to the UK departure from the EU.

Workforce

It is estimated that the UK recruits 7000 nurses and 2000 doctors annually from the EU. The UK is currently unable to meet its workforce requirements for the NHS from its domestic higher education system. To do this it will need to create around 5 medical schools and a dozen nursing schools, not to mention the unmet needs for other health professionals such as pharmacists, physiotherapists, and so on.

The UK will be unable to widen recruitment from outside the EU without drawing people from countries which really need their own domestic supply; as well, non-EU migrants need to meet a points-based system, which also includes an income test, and many healthcare workers in nursing homes, for instance, earn less that this amount — EU recruits are exempt from this test.

The UK will likely need to repudiate the mutual recognition of qualifications if it also repudiates free movement of labour. Individuals acquiring new qualifications from the various Royal Colleges, for instance, will not be certain that those qualifications will be recognised should they return to the EU at some point.

Research

We’re hearing a lot about research as the UK is a major participant in EU research funding rounds. Academics in the UK will become third country researchers after Brexit and there is no guarantee that they will be able to lead major projects, but only be participants. The loss annually is about one billion euros or so in R&D funding. While the UK is an attractive place to do research, the gradual erosion of this pre-eminent position is likely if UK researchers lead fewer major research programmes and the universities are unable to recruit from the EU — again, mutual recognition of qualifications may also be a consideration.

 

Drugs and Devices

The European Medicines Agency will need to relocate to within the EU. While this is perhaps 800-900 jobs at EMA, there is a large regulatory eco-system around EMA that will also need to move. Perhaps less noticed, though, is that the UK will need to duplicate EMA’s regulatory functions meaning that all pharma and device companies will need to file applications to the UK quite separately to the EU. Pharmacovigilance is one area that will need to be duplicated as EMA requires the competent authority to be inside the EU.

Drug and device prices themselves should rise as the UK exits the single market. That the UK is already a difficult market for market access, might lead to fewer drugs being launched in the UK. While these factors are hard to quantify, but in the absence of alternatives, the NHS drug budget might go up by 10% (the tariff rate), while new products might be delayed; that they are launched in the EU would not provide market access to the UK under the free movement rules. The UK might become a low priority country for new products.

Patients

All these considerations will have an impact on patients who will lose access to portability of healthcare benefits provided by the EHIC (European Health Insurance Card) system. As well, the A1/S1 arrangements will disappear. This has some important implications for both the UK and EU states and their citizens.

France and Spain have a large number of Brits living there, while tournists travel all over. For instance, Malta receives about 1.5 million tourists a year, 500,000 of which are from the UK and access Malta’s healthcare system through the EHIC with the UK paying the bills to Malta. By losing the post-retirement S1 arrangements, individuals will need private health insurance, while tourists will need to buy medical travel insurance. Medical travel insurance is a very poor substitute for EHIC as it excludes pre-existing conditions and is not a substitute for statutory cover. Business travellers will also need to carry private travel insurance. [Note: see my FT comment describing this type of insurance as a money pump, following Tim Harford.]

EU citizens travelling to the UK will need to have travel insurance covering third countries or take out private insurance while in the UK. The UK’s private medical insurance industry offers very poor value products and importantly does not offer an equivalent substitute for NHS or social insurance cover, because of their failure to cover pre-existing conditions; with their additional limitations, access to care would be very difficult if individuals relied on a UK insurance product.

 

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